A Wind in the Door

It is November. When Meg comes home from school, Charles Wallace tells her he saw dragons in the twin’s vegetable garden. That night Meg, Calvin and C.W. go to the vegetable garden to meet the Teacher (Blajeny) who explains that what they are seeing isn’t a dragon at all, but a cherubim named Proginoskes. It turns out that C.W. is ill and that Blajeny and Proginoskes are there to make him well – by making him well, they will keep the balance of the universe in check and save it from the evil Echthros.

Meg, Calvin and Mr. Jenkins (grade school principal) must travel inside C.W. to have this battle and save Charles’ life as well as the balance of the universe.

Originally published in 1973.

Genre: Middle grade
Science fiction/fantasy

Other Books in the Series

‘A Wind in the Door’ is the second book in L’Engle’s The Time Quintet, which also includes:

A Wind in the Door

Reviews

“Complex concepts of space and time are handled well for young readers, and the author creates a suspenseful, life-and-death drama that is believably of cosmic significance. Complex and rich in mystical religious insights, this is breathtaking entertainment.”
―Starred, School Library Journal

“This book, like the entire Time Quintet, is a treasure. Every time I read it, I feel as if I were only a tiny part of some great, beautiful plan, which I am; but I also feel reassured that I have been given a part to play, and most importantly, that the Planner loves me. It is only a very special book that can make a person feel that way.”
―Kristen, ChristianBook.com, 2010

“Amazing! This book is an awesome book for anyone who likes science fiction or fantasy books, or anyone who is willing to read something. just make sure you read a Wrinkle in Time first! Or else it will be really confusing.”
―Anonymous child’s review (age 11), Common Sense Media, 2009

Articles

“Fighting Nothingness: A Wind in the Door”
Mari Ness, 2012 / TOR

“In Which Three Adults Discuss ‘A Wind in the Door’ Seriously and at Length”
Johannah King-Slutsky & Joe Howley, 2015 / The Toast

“Farandolae”
Peggy Kolm, 2007 / Biology in Science Fiction Blog